Bipolar

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Bipolar disorder can also be known as manic-depressive illness. The brain causes unusual shifts in mood and activity levels. Bipolar symptoms are different than usual ups and downs that everyone experiences.

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A manic episode can include the following:

  • Long periods of feeling “high” or overly happy and outgoing
  • Extreme irritable mood, agitation, feeling “jumpy” or “wired”
  • Talking very fast
  • Jumping from one idea to another, racing thoughts
  • Poor concentration, being easily distracted
  • Intense goal-directed activity and taking on multiple projects
  • Feeling restless, sleeping very little
  • Impulsivity, taking part in a lot of high-risk sexual behavior, hasty business decisions, spending sprees
  • Abusing alcohol or drugs, having relationship problems, performing poorly at work or school

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A depressive episode can include the following:

  • Long periods of feeling worried or empty
  • Lack of pleasure in things, hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feeling tired, fatigue, feeling “slowed down”
  • Problems concentrating, difficulty remembering things, trouble making decisions
  • Changes in eating or sleeping habits
  • Thoughts of suicide
  • Abusing alcohol or drugs, having relationship problems, performing poorly at work or school

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Education about Bipolar disorder is important. Persons experiencing Bipolar illness can also respond to multiple types of treatment: education about the illness, medications, behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, exercise, and practicing good sleep hygiene.

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